Seven-color Tile

April 15, 2021

Shekoufeh Ahmadi Arts & Crafts
Reading Time: 2 Minutes

One of the most important handicrafts of Shiraz is the seven-color tile, which is obtained by stacking white glazed tiles with dimensions of 15 by 15 and 20 by 20 cm. The design and use of this type of tile have no specific history, but the evidence indicates that seven-color tiles have been used in the construction of the building of Persepolis and works made during the Achaemenid period.

Due to their high quality, these tiles are considered among the most important exports of Shiraz to other provinces, as well as to the countries of the Persian Gulf. This beautiful art has been used in places such as Vakil Mosque, Nasir Al-Mulk Mosque, and Zinat Al-Mulk House. Its most important feature is the quality and special composition of the glaze in the seven-color tile. The main designs are Islamic designs with national themes.

The reason behind the use of the number seven is due to the limitation of colors, because what is important in this style of work is the right color and the right combination of colors. Today, the dimensions of seven-color tiles are azure, turquoise, red, yellow, fawn, white, and black. One of the differences between Shiraz tiles and other seven-color tiles is the quality and special composition of the glaze. Another difference is the large use of the pattern known as "flowers and birds". In Shiraz tiles, bright and cheerful colors such as pistachio green, pink, yellow, and white are used, among which pink is more impressive.

In a Nutshell

The term "seven-color tile" was first used by a historian of the Ilkhani court, which refers to the technique of painting with enamel on the glaze, and today the term refers to the same technique. One of the best examples of this artistic style is Nasir Al-Molk Mosque, which is also called the Pink Mosque of Shiraz. Other buildings decorated with seven-color tiles include Vakil Mosque, Narenjestan Mansion, and Afifabad Garden in Shiraz.

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